Celebrate the Big Stuff and the Small Stuff

Photo by mebrett

Photo by mebrett

Someone asked me recently what some of my accomplishments of the last quarter were.  I should've anticipated the question and been prepared for it, but my brain went blank as I tried to recall the last 3 months.  Have I been properly recognizing my successes?  I think the answer is mostly yes--I just don't want to keep score.  

Celebrating your own success is good (my favorite: fancy dinner with friends).  Celebrating others' successes is even better (I like to surprise people with gifts).  A promotion, a company anniversary, the effort it took to come to the office when things are hard--there are lots of opportunities to acknowledge and celebrate others.  I'm not the only one who thinks so:

Infographic_CareerCelebrations_Mar6.jpg

How do you recognize your accomplishments?  Other's achievements?

Allison Pollard

I help people discover their agile instincts and develop their coaching abilities. As an agile coach with Improving in Dallas, I enjoy mentoring others to become great Scrum Masters, coaching managers to grow teams that deliver amazing results, and fostering communities that provide sustainability for agile transformations. In my experience, applying agile methods improves delivery, strengthens relationships, and builds trust between business and IT. A big believer in the power of community-based learning, I grew the DFW Scrum user group significantly over the five years I served as an organizer. I am also a Certified Professional Co-Active Coach, a foodie, and proud glasses wearer.

Leadership Link Round-Up

Photo by steve_lynx

Photo by steve_lynx

Today's theme is: Praise, Rewards, and Motivating Others.

Linking Agile to HR Theory - A look at the Agile Manifesto and various theories about people and teams.  By reviewing the people side of projects promoted by Agile, the embodiment of many established good principles are evident. Projects rarely fail because the technology does not work; projects usually fail because of people issues. Finding ways to improve the people side of projects, even if they appear counterintuitive, pays huge dividends.

For Best Results, Forget the Bonus - Alfie Kohn sums up the motto of the American workplace as, "Do this, and you'll get that."  She goes on to explain the problems with rewards.

The 6 Rules for Rewards - Jurgen Appelo gives us rules for rewards that help avoid the problems with cheating and gaming rules that Kohn pointed out above.

10 Questions and Answers for Managers about Praise -  What is praise, why is it important, and a few simple rules on how to give praise effectively.

Allison Pollard

I help people discover their agile instincts and develop their coaching abilities. As an agile coach with Improving in Dallas, I enjoy mentoring others to become great Scrum Masters, coaching managers to grow teams that deliver amazing results, and fostering communities that provide sustainability for agile transformations. In my experience, applying agile methods improves delivery, strengthens relationships, and builds trust between business and IT. A big believer in the power of community-based learning, I grew the DFW Scrum user group significantly over the five years I served as an organizer. I am also a Certified Professional Co-Active Coach, a foodie, and proud glasses wearer.