Embracing My Boringness

Photo by Quinn Dombrowski

Photo by Quinn Dombrowski

If you could only pick one, would you rather have a job that is fulfilling or one that is interesting?

My husband makes video games for a living.  At social events and parties, people always want to know what he’s working on and what he’s worked on previously.  Clearly his job is interesting to other people, even when he can’t talk about what’s he doing because the title hasn’t been announced.

I work in an office 40 hours a week and spend most of my time in meetings, writing notes to myself about what I’ve heard and observed, and having conversations with people.  My evenings are filled with activities like hosting user group meetings, attending networking events, and developing my coaching skills through learning and practice.  Vacation time is spent attending conferences and agile coach camps.  My friends and family label all of this as “work stuff.”  Yep, I am a rather boring person:

I don't like to talk about myself much because I think I am boring.  A manager invited me to lunch a while back and made a rule that we couldn't talk about work stuff after I had already agreed to go--I deflated in that moment.  And a coach gave me an inquiry a few weeks ago that rattled me for days:

What would it mean to have a fun, authentic life where people want to work with me?

To me, the clear answer was that this was not the life for me.  Just no.  I am not a fun person.  Do not come to me for fun.  I do not value fun.  Other coaches can give you fun. 

It was a visceral reaction.

Thankfully I realized that I can have a fulfilling, authentic life where people want to work with me.  More importantly to me, I can have an interesting, authentic life where people want to work with me.

I work in an office 40 hours a week and spend most of my time in meetings, writing notes to myself about what I’ve heard and observed, and having conversations with people.  My evenings are filled with activities like hosting user group meetings, attending networking events, and developing my coaching skills through learning and practice.  Vacation time is spent attending conferences and agile coach camps.  I do it all because I find it interesting.

Allison Pollard

I help people discover their agile instincts and develop their coaching abilities. As an agile coach with Improving in Dallas, I enjoy mentoring others to become great Scrum Masters, coaching managers to grow teams that deliver amazing results, and fostering communities that provide sustainability for agile transformations. In my experience, applying agile methods improves delivery, strengthens relationships, and builds trust between business and IT. A big believer in the power of community-based learning, I grew the DFW Scrum user group significantly over the five years I served as an organizer. I am also a Certified Professional Co-Active Coach, a foodie, and proud glasses wearer.

Improving Enterprises is Looking to Pay You to Learn

Photo by Travis Isaacs

Photo by Travis Isaacs

My employer, Improving Enterprises, has a new program, and we’re looking to hire some new people. Our goal is to take people with minimal to entry level development skills (not anyone who is building large enterprise applications today), hire these people, pay them to go through a bootcamp led by our best and brightest, and then at the end, provided some criteria are met, hire them as either Associate Consultants or Consultants within our organization. Pretty cool, right?

This program is a huge opportunity, and I wish it existed when I graduated from college. You’re likely a candidate for this program if you meet these requirements:

  • Some programming experience is necessary.
    • Web experience is not necessary, though it is helpful.
    • Lack the experience or expertise to be an Improver
  • Exhibit excellent potential, aptitude, and attitude
  • Are willing to work long and hard over the next few months to become an Improver.

If you apply and are accepted, you should expect:

  • The program is 9-6 plus homework assignments including user group attendance and supplemental online courses.
  • It is intended to be an intensive, “drink from the firehose” experience.
  • You will be paid a nominal salary.
  • The salary will increase once you pass the board exam and become billable.
  • There is an interview process.

We intend for this bootcamp to be as beneficial as a master's program in terms of marketable skills. Interested?  Contact me.

Allison Pollard

I help people discover their agile instincts and develop their coaching abilities. As an agile coach with Improving in Dallas, I enjoy mentoring others to become great Scrum Masters, coaching managers to grow teams that deliver amazing results, and fostering communities that provide sustainability for agile transformations. In my experience, applying agile methods improves delivery, strengthens relationships, and builds trust between business and IT. A big believer in the power of community-based learning, I grew the DFW Scrum user group significantly over the five years I served as an organizer. I am also a Certified Professional Co-Active Coach, a foodie, and proud glasses wearer.

The Happiest Careers

Photo by elycefeliz

Photo by elycefeliz

I saw the below infographic from Job-Applications.com on The Revolutionary Club and thought it was interesting.  There's a lot of good information here.  

Paychecks & Happiness: Who's Staying Stress Free -- Brought to you by Job-Applications.com
Paychecks & Happiness: Who’s Staying Stress Free infographic courtesy of Job-Applications.com

To be honest, I started laughing when I saw Software Developer listed under happiest jobs--is it really funny?  I've worked at a number of companies, and many software developers are satisfied with their jobs.  They often have good paychecks.  But I don't think of them as happy.  They are not smiling as they work and raving about their work over lunch or happy hour.  Do you agree that software developer is one of the happiest careers?

Allison Pollard

I help people discover their agile instincts and develop their coaching abilities. As an agile coach with Improving in Dallas, I enjoy mentoring others to become great Scrum Masters, coaching managers to grow teams that deliver amazing results, and fostering communities that provide sustainability for agile transformations. In my experience, applying agile methods improves delivery, strengthens relationships, and builds trust between business and IT. A big believer in the power of community-based learning, I grew the DFW Scrum user group significantly over the five years I served as an organizer. I am also a Certified Professional Co-Active Coach, a foodie, and proud glasses wearer.