Be Agile Week is Coming - March 11-17, 2019

Agile helps people and organizations to achieve awesomeness by optimizing flow, accelerating innovation, and enabling people to experience happiness at work. Tucson mayor Jonathan Rothschild has proclaimed “Be Agile Week” in March to coincide with the Agile Open Arizona event. Attend the week of certifications, workshops, and conference in Tucson to learn how to deliver value faster to customers and experience friction-less collaboration. Or act locally in your community by doing something kind, specific, and socially impactful that could have global implications.

During the week of March 11, 2019 through March 17, 2019, share your actions or experiences on Twitter at @agilealliance or @agileopenaz and be sure to use #BeAgileWeek in your posts and tweets!

Allison Pollard

I help people discover their agile instincts and develop their coaching abilities. As an agile coach with Improving in Dallas, I enjoy mentoring others to become great Scrum Masters, coaching managers to grow teams that deliver amazing results, and fostering communities that provide sustainability for agile transformations. In my experience, applying agile methods improves delivery, strengthens relationships, and builds trust between business and IT. A big believer in the power of community-based learning, I grew the DFW Scrum user group significantly over the five years I served as an organizer. I am also a Certified Professional Co-Active Coach, a foodie, and proud glasses wearer.

The Hidden Truth about DISC

Image by Jessica Wilson

Image by Jessica Wilson

DISC is a simple model that describes four behavior traits: dominance, influence, steadiness, and compliance. The simplicity makes it easy to introduce and use in short workshops, which is why Barry and I incorporated it into our Brewing Great Agile Team Dynamics presentation.

We found ourselves answering questions and talking more about DISC after our Keep Austin Agile 2018 session, and we were going deeper into what the model reveals. Barry reminded me of a core concept: every one of us has all four behavior styles within us. A certain one may be favored or applied more often, but we have the capacity for all of them.

So that coworker whose behavior challenges and downright frustrates you? It's revealing something about you. We like to think other people's behaviors is about them, and yet our reactions are clearly about us! Our coworkers, bosses, friends, and partners help us learn about ourselves. They can be mirrors to help us see inside ourselves more clearly. That quality or characteristic that makes it hard to be around them lives in us too. It might show up differently, but it's the same thing. What's the usefulness to it? Discovering the answer makes it easier to choose how to be in relationship when that quality is present--and it will certainly come up because we've already seen it in others and now in ourselves.

Looking at a model like DISC to understand how we can adapt to others' behavior and communication needs starts creating a path for us to more consciously choose how we show up and engage in those relationships. Thanks, Barry, for reminding me why such a simple concept can be incredibly powerful!

Allison Pollard

I help people discover their agile instincts and develop their coaching abilities. As an agile coach with Improving in Dallas, I enjoy mentoring others to become great Scrum Masters, coaching managers to grow teams that deliver amazing results, and fostering communities that provide sustainability for agile transformations. In my experience, applying agile methods improves delivery, strengthens relationships, and builds trust between business and IT. A big believer in the power of community-based learning, I grew the DFW Scrum user group significantly over the five years I served as an organizer. I am also a Certified Professional Co-Active Coach, a foodie, and proud glasses wearer.

Roundtable Roulette - A Podcast Experiment

Photo by SolutionsIQ - Allison Pollard, Chris Shinkle, Leon Sabarsky, and Howard Sublett at Keep Austin Agile 2017

Photo by SolutionsIQ - Allison Pollard, Chris Shinkle, Leon Sabarsky, and Howard Sublett at Keep Austin Agile 2017

This year I was fortunate to be speaking at Keep Austin Agile again, and SolutionsIQ was setup to record for their Agile Amped podcast. The podcast is recorded live at conferences and features interviews with various speakers--it's an exciting way to hear some of the energy of a conference for those unable to attend. And as a speaker, it's lovely to have a more intimate conversation when you're at an event to present to a large group of people.

Anyways, Howard Sublett invited me to join him, Chris Shinkle, and Leon Sabarsky in a podcast experiment that he called Roundtable Roulette. We took turns answering random questions that we had not seen before, and it was a lively discussion! Listen to us talk about what advice we would give to Product Owners, which TV or movie character would be a great Scrum Master and more -- Roundtable Roulette at Keep Austin Agile.

Allison Pollard

I help people discover their agile instincts and develop their coaching abilities. As an agile coach with Improving in Dallas, I enjoy mentoring others to become great Scrum Masters, coaching managers to grow teams that deliver amazing results, and fostering communities that provide sustainability for agile transformations. In my experience, applying agile methods improves delivery, strengthens relationships, and builds trust between business and IT. A big believer in the power of community-based learning, I grew the DFW Scrum user group significantly over the five years I served as an organizer. I am also a Certified Professional Co-Active Coach, a foodie, and proud glasses wearer.

Power Coaching at Keep Austin Agile

This week is the Keep Austin Agile conference, which has been one of my favorites for the last four years. Cherie Silas and I are presenting a new session called Power Coaching. As professional coaches, Cherie and I incorporate coaching skills into our work as agilists, and we want to help others to do the same. Hope to see you there!

Allison Pollard

I help people discover their agile instincts and develop their coaching abilities. As an agile coach with Improving in Dallas, I enjoy mentoring others to become great Scrum Masters, coaching managers to grow teams that deliver amazing results, and fostering communities that provide sustainability for agile transformations. In my experience, applying agile methods improves delivery, strengthens relationships, and builds trust between business and IT. A big believer in the power of community-based learning, I grew the DFW Scrum user group significantly over the five years I served as an organizer. I am also a Certified Professional Co-Active Coach, a foodie, and proud glasses wearer.

Something New - Lightning Talks

Photo by Carolina Odman

Photo by Carolina Odman

I've presented a number of different topics at various conferences with different co-presenters, and I thought it would be fun to stretch my skills by trying something new. I've submitted a 7-minute Pecha Kucha on Communities Support Transformation and a 3-minute lightning talk called Coaches Say the Darndest Things. Both formats are outside of my comfort zone, and I'm hoping at least one will be selected for the Agile 2016 conference. If you are attending the conference, please vote for my topics at the links above. I'd love to have a deadline to create and refine the talks by--external accountability helps!

Allison Pollard

I help people discover their agile instincts and develop their coaching abilities. As an agile coach with Improving in Dallas, I enjoy mentoring others to become great Scrum Masters, coaching managers to grow teams that deliver amazing results, and fostering communities that provide sustainability for agile transformations. In my experience, applying agile methods improves delivery, strengthens relationships, and builds trust between business and IT. A big believer in the power of community-based learning, I grew the DFW Scrum user group significantly over the five years I served as an organizer. I am also a Certified Professional Co-Active Coach, a foodie, and proud glasses wearer.

Technical Excellence isn’t Something You Just Sprinkle On

Photo by Michael Coppola

Photo by Michael Coppola

Mike Rieser and I had the pleasure of presenting Technical Excellence Doesn't Just Happen--Igniting a Craftsmanship Culture at Keep Austin Agile 2016. Mike and I partnered as coaches to help an organization through a technical turnaround, and the session is about why technical excellence matters and what we did to support 20 scrum teams improving their technical practices. Check out this interview we did with Howard Sublett on the subject:

Allison Pollard

I help people discover their agile instincts and develop their coaching abilities. As an agile coach with Improving in Dallas, I enjoy mentoring others to become great Scrum Masters, coaching managers to grow teams that deliver amazing results, and fostering communities that provide sustainability for agile transformations. In my experience, applying agile methods improves delivery, strengthens relationships, and builds trust between business and IT. A big believer in the power of community-based learning, I grew the DFW Scrum user group significantly over the five years I served as an organizer. I am also a Certified Professional Co-Active Coach, a foodie, and proud glasses wearer.

Dallas TechFest - Not Just for Developers!

I am excited to be presenting again at Dallas TechFest, and while the conference is packed with sessions about the latest in development, it is not just for developers.  Yes, that's right: there are sessions for those of us who work with developers but don't sling code ourselves.  I'll be doing a lunch presentation with Mike Rieser on Technical Excellence Doesn't Just Happen--Igniting a Craftsmanship Culture and co-presenting later in the afternoon with Chris Murman on Changing Organizational Mindset.  No code involved in either talk.  Check out the schedule, and I hope to see you there!

Allison Pollard

I help people discover their agile instincts and develop their coaching abilities. As an agile coach with Improving in Dallas, I enjoy mentoring others to become great Scrum Masters, coaching managers to grow teams that deliver amazing results, and fostering communities that provide sustainability for agile transformations. In my experience, applying agile methods improves delivery, strengthens relationships, and builds trust between business and IT. A big believer in the power of community-based learning, I grew the DFW Scrum user group significantly over the five years I served as an organizer. I am also a Certified Professional Co-Active Coach, a foodie, and proud glasses wearer.

How to Communicate and Recognize Appreciation

Photo by jen collins

Photo by jen collins

Cherie and I presented at the UT Dallas Project Management Symposium this week, and it was a lot of fun.  We once again presented Beyond Removing Impediments: Scrum Master as Team Coach and also had the opportunity to do a second session on Motivating People Through the Language of Appreciation.  It was our first time presenting that topic, and the positive feedback was tremendous.  Then again, when you're talking to people for an hour about appreciation, they know how to practice it when you're done.  ;-)

Honestly though, feeling appreciated is rare for many people--70% of employees say they receive no praise at work.  That hurts the individuals and the organization.  People who are undervalued are less likely to go above and beyond at work and they are more likely to leave for another job.  Here's the real kicker: your organization might be trying to show some appreciation for employees, but they are not recognizing it!

Each one of us has certain things that we look for that tell us we are valued by others--different reference points that tell us, “I value and appreciate you.”  When people speak to us in the way that speaks value and appreciation to them--and it is different than they way we say it--we don’t receive the message.  Why?  Because we don’t recognize that they are saying it.  For example, a manager might give an employee a gift card in recognition of his hard work and long hours in completing a project successfully, but the employee sees it as an empty gesture because he would really like someone to tell him how valuable he is to the organization.

We speak different languages of appreciation, and understanding the different languages of appreciation helps others to receive what you are trying to offer them.  If we can understand the language we are expecting to hear and how others might possibly be expressing appreciation and value, then we can both send and perceive the appropriate messages.

The 5 languages of appreciation are:

1.     Quality Time – Quality time includes focused attention and quality conversation.  A person who speaks this language feels valued when they perceive that someone displays a genuine interest in them.  This language focuses on hearing the person receiving the quality time and about participating in the conversation with them.  Quality time also includes a sharing of life together.  So, working side by side or going to lunch together also qualifies as quality time.  

2.     Words of Affirmation – Words of affirmation include specific words of encouragement or praise for accomplishment and for effort.  It includes saying, “thank you.”  Words of affirmation can be given one on one, in front of someone the person views as important (such as a supervisor or the team), or publicly.  This appreciation language focuses on the words being said to the person receiving the words of affirmation, and it is about them and their contributions or character traits that are valuable and appreciated. Can be written, verbal, or in some other format including music, video, etc.  The important thing is the message of praise and encouragement communicated.

3.     Receiving Gifts – Receiving gifts is the vehicle for some individuals that sends the message that says, “You are valuable to me and I thought about you when you weren’t with me because I appreciate you.”  The dollar value of the gift is not what is significant but the emotional thought about the person that drove the gift to be given.  For people who speak this language, the gift becomes tangible evidence that they are valued.  It is a constant reminder that they are appreciated.   

4.     Acts of Service – Acts of service is characterized by helping with tasks that need to be completed.  Some might call this teamwork.  Some key things to remember with acts of service are:

  • Get your own work finished before offering to help someone with theirs
  • Ask before helping
  • Make sure to do it their way if you are going to help
  • Finish what you commit to do and make it clear what you can commit to finish

5.     Physical Contact – Physical contact in the workplace is a touchy subject. (Pardon the pun) The truth is that for some people this is the language that speaks the loudest to them that they are truly valued and appreciated.  The key is to understand what is appropriate and acceptable and to adhere to those guidelines.  Depending on the culture of the organization there will be different guidelines but for most handshakes, knuckle bumps, high-fives, or even a pat on the shoulder are acceptable.

Allison Pollard

I help people discover their agile instincts and develop their coaching abilities. As an agile coach with Improving in Dallas, I enjoy mentoring others to become great Scrum Masters, coaching managers to grow teams that deliver amazing results, and fostering communities that provide sustainability for agile transformations. In my experience, applying agile methods improves delivery, strengthens relationships, and builds trust between business and IT. A big believer in the power of community-based learning, I grew the DFW Scrum user group significantly over the five years I served as an organizer. I am also a Certified Professional Co-Active Coach, a foodie, and proud glasses wearer.

Upcoming Speaking Events

Photo by Harmon

Photo by Harmon

I'm excited to share that there are quite a few agile events coming up in Texas where I will be speaking!  I continue to be amazed at the strength of the agile community, and I look forward to meeting new people and seeing old faces.

  • Dallas Agile Leadership Network - July 29, 2014 - I will be co-presenting with Ty Crockett on Creating Strong and Passionate Communities of Practice
  • 8th Annual UTDallas Project Management Symposium - August 14-15, 2014 - I will be co-presenting two topics with Cherie SilasBeyond Removing Impediments: Scrum Master as Team Coach and Motivating People through the Language of Appreciation
  • AgileDotNext in Houston, TX - August 22, 2014 - I will be co-presenting two topics: Beyond Removing Impediments: Scrum Master as Team Coach with Cherie Silas and Creating Strong and Passionate Communities of Practice with Ty Crockett
  • PMI Professional Development Day in Fort Worth, TX - September 12, 2013 - I will be co-presenting Motivating People through the Language of Appreciation with Cherie Silas
  • Houston TechFest - September 13, 2014 - I will be co-presenting two topics with Cherie Silas: Change Your Questions Change Your World and Beyond Removing Impediments: Scrum Master as Team Coach

What upcoming events are you excited about?

Allison Pollard

I help people discover their agile instincts and develop their coaching abilities. As an agile coach with Improving in Dallas, I enjoy mentoring others to become great Scrum Masters, coaching managers to grow teams that deliver amazing results, and fostering communities that provide sustainability for agile transformations. In my experience, applying agile methods improves delivery, strengthens relationships, and builds trust between business and IT. A big believer in the power of community-based learning, I grew the DFW Scrum user group significantly over the five years I served as an organizer. I am also a Certified Professional Co-Active Coach, a foodie, and proud glasses wearer.

Open Space Summary: Creating a Learning Organization

Photo by Enokson

Photo by Enokson

I made my first open space offering!  Below are some of the points we discussed on “Creating a Learning Organization” at Agile Coach Camp Canada 2014.

As a consultant, I am often brought into a client organization to help them go from their current state to a new and improved state. Change is not easy for most people and organizations.  The Satir change model depicts the phases of change, and the change described in the model is positive overall: the performance of the system is improved.  But in the middle there is a drastic drop, the Chaos phase.  That’s where the turbulence is. 

Last year, I conducted an end-of-year retrospective at a client organization and asked people to draw pictures of what it had felt like to learn and change over the year.  There was an image of exploding brain.  A juggler.  And the one that resonated with me the most: a flower sprouting from the ground as rain falls and a rainbow soars above.  Some folks recognized that learning and changing meant rain and storms might happen but something beautiful would emerge in the end!  We called it “Over the Rainbow.”

That image has caused me to give more thought to how I help my clients.  I can help them through the change model and leave them in an improved state, but what then?  Have they simply reached a new plateau, or are they more capable to make future changes?  What if instead of a one-time radical change (like kaikaku) the client also knew how to make continuous improvements (like kaizen)? 

Clients rarely ask upfront for real transformations or to become learning organizations, but as we work with them and continue to explore possibilities, these larger goals may emerge.  Coaches do not define the client’s agenda—coaches help the client to clarify a goal or vision and take action to achieve it.  We help draw out BHAGs (big hairy audacious goals) or shining stars, and a learning organization may emerge from incremental steps to achieve the organization’s goals.  Organizations might ask why—why is it important to become a learning organization?  The more capable an organization is of learning, the less likely it is to become extinct.  Given the increasing rate of change in business, learning is a necessity to stay ahead of the competition.

In order for people to continuously improve, they must regularly try new things and learn, which means going through the stages of competence over and over and over:

  • Unconscious incompetence – we don’t know what we don’t know.
  • Conscious incompetence – we recognize what we don’t know.  Practice and making mistakes can be vital here.
  • Conscious competence – we know how to do something but doing it requires concentration.
  • Unconscious competence – we have had so much practice with a skill that it has become "second nature" and can be performed easily. We may also be able to teach it to others.

The conscious incompetence stage often means people are vulnerable, and an organization needs to provide safety for employees to be in that stage so they are able to stretch and learn.  

So as agilists, what can we do for the organizations we work in to create safety for a learning organization?

  • Introduce “options” – brainstorm multiple ideas about what to do next.  Keeping the status quo is one option.
  • Talk about “experiments” – emphasize that decisions are not permanent.  We learn by trying something for a period of time and evaluating it.
  • Create study groups – form communities of practice or book clubs to emphasize learning together.
  • Celebrate failure – making mistakes is a part of learning, and recognizing mistakes is important.
  • Collect data – observe and analyze your current state.  It is important to understand what is going on in order to determine what to change or improve.
  • Show visible support for discovery – host hackathons, introduce Google’s 20% time or FedEx Days to promote innovative thinking.

Learning is the bottleneck in software development.  Perhaps in order to improve software delivery, the learning capacity of an organization must be increased.

Other resources on learning organizations:

Allison Pollard

I help people discover their agile instincts and develop their coaching abilities. As an agile coach with Improving in Dallas, I enjoy mentoring others to become great Scrum Masters, coaching managers to grow teams that deliver amazing results, and fostering communities that provide sustainability for agile transformations. In my experience, applying agile methods improves delivery, strengthens relationships, and builds trust between business and IT. A big believer in the power of community-based learning, I grew the DFW Scrum user group significantly over the five years I served as an organizer. I am also a Certified Professional Co-Active Coach, a foodie, and proud glasses wearer.